Combustible Dust Safety General Hazards and Code Compliance

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Course Overview

Designed for safety personnel, engineers, scientists, contractors, supervisors, and operators who need to understand the hazards of combustible dusts and the NFPA Combustible Dust Standards and Recommended Practices, this course will review the general hazards of combustible dusts and help you understand where the different standards apply and the specific differences between the standards.

You will gain a comprehensive review of:

  • NFPA 652 Standard on the Fundamentals of Combustible Dust
  • NFPA 654 Standard for the Prevention of Fire and Dust Explosions from the Manufacturing, Processing, and Handling of Combustible Particulate Solids
  • NFPA 61 Standard for the Prevention of Fires and Dust Explosions in Agricultural and Food Processing Facilities
  • NFPA 499 Recommended Practice for the Classification of Combustible Dusts and of Hazardous (Classified) Locations for Electrical Installations in Chemical Process Areas

Learn:

  • The general hazards of combustible dusts and how to identify them
  • The differences between the NFPA Combustible Dust Standards
  • How to comply with the NFPA Combustible Dust Standards
  • How to classify combustible dust installations
  • How to achieve code compliance and operate safely 

 

Who Should Attend?

This course will be valuable to those who manufacture, process or handle combustible dusts in chemical or food processing operations

Course Outline

Welcome and Introduction

Combustible Dust Hazards

  • Types of combustible dusts
  • Combustible dust accidents
  • Dust explosions and fires
  • Dust/gas mixtures

Combustible Dust Standards

  • Applicability and use
  • Relationship and coverage

NFPA 652 Standard on the Fundamentals of Combustible Dust

  • Why NFPA 652?
  • Coverage
  • General requirements
  • Hazard identification
  • Performance-based design
  • Dust hazard analysis
  • Hazard mitigation
  • Management systems

NFPA 654 Standard for the Prevention of Fire and Dust Explosions from the Manufacturing, Processing, and Handling of Combustible Particulate Solids

  • Differences form NFPA 652
  • Facility and systems design
  • Process equipment
  • Fugitive dust control and housekeeping
  • Ignition sources
  • Fire protection
  • Training procedures
  • Inspection and maintenance

NFPA 61 Standard for the Prevention of Fires and Dust Explosions in Agricultural and Food Processing Facilities

  • Differences from NFPA 652
  • Hazard identification
  • Hazard management
  • Management systems

NFPA 499 Recommended Practice for the Classification of Combustible Dusts and of Hazardous (Classified) Locations for Electrical Installations in Chemical Process Areas

  • How to classify an area for a dust hazard
  • What codes affect classification

Summary

Instructors

Richard Palluzi

Richard P. Palluzi, PE, CSP, of Richard P. Palluzi LLC is a consultant to the pilot plant and laboratory research community on safety, design, and research project management. He retired as a Distinguished Engineering Associate after almost 40 years at ExxonMobil Research and Engineering, where he was involved in the design, construction, and support of pilot plants and laboratories for ExxonMobil’s research site in Clinton, New Jersey, as well as affiliates worldwide. Rich is the author of two books, and numerous articles and presentations as well as a past chair of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers Pilot Plant Committee, ExxonMobil’s Pilot Plant and Laboratory Safety Standards Committee, and ExxonMobil’s Safe Operations Team for their Clinton facility. Rich is on the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) NFPA-45 Fire Protection for Laboratories Using Chemicals and NFPA-55 Industrial and Medical Gasses committees. He has BE and ME degrees in chemical engineering from Stevens Institute of Technology. 

Elaine Andrysick

Elaine M. Andrysick joined Engineering Professional Development, University of Wisconsin-Madison, as a continuing engineering education specialist in 1988.  She is responsible for the development and delivery of high-value continuing engineering education short courses for practicing professionals in the areas of chemical and process engineering and laser material processing.  Also, she manages the University’s Laser Welding Certificate program.

 

Upcoming dates (0)

Take this course when it’s offered next!

Program Director

Elaine Andrysick

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